25 Endangered Animals Everyone Should Know More About

Some of the following animals live in the deep sea, some of them in the jungle, and others on the mountaintops. But no matter where they live, they have one sad thing in common: all of them are endangered species.

#25. Black-Footed Ferret

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These furry critters are the most endangered mammals in North America. According to the World Wildlife Fund, there are only around 300 left across the continent. Their existence is not only threatened by disease, but also by loss of habitat.

#24. Red Panda

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Poaching and loss of habitat have brought about the endangerment of this animal. In fact, there are only 10,000 adult red pandas in the wild. Tables might be turning, as conservation efforts have included making red panda hunting illegal in certain areas. However, their low birth rate makes it a slow process.

#23. Tapir

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Four of the five species of tapir that exist all over the world are either endangered or vulnerable, due to the destruction of their habitats and poaching. Moreover, since tapirs have a very slow reproductive rate, conservation efforts have been more challenging than expected.

#22. Western Stellar Sea Lion

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Steller sea lions are divided up by their migration patterns as either western or eastern; and while the population of eastern stellers is flourishing, the same cannot be said about the western group (Alaska, specifically), which is decreasing due to over-fishing of the lions’ food source and other environmental factors.

#21. American Pika

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In 2010, these very small mammals were denied protection from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), even though advocacy groups and a study from the U.S. Geological Survey suggested that were disappearing because of climate change.

#20. Peruvian Black Spider Monkey

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This species population has been cut in half over the past 45 years, so it’s no surprise that the Peruvian Black Spider Monkey was added to the endangered lists in 2014. Habitat destruction and being hunted for the Amazonian meat trade have contributed to this species endangerment.

#19. Galapagos Penguin

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These penguins are the only ones who live above the equator, and the changing environment is causing their numbers to decrease. The population is less than 2000 as not only pollution but also climate affect the area.

#18. Okapi

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The okapis, that are also known as “forest giraffes,” were classified as endangered in 2013 after their population went down 50% over an 18-year period. This is due to the fact that they are targets for poachers. In addition, there’s the ongoing conflict in their native Democratic Republic of the Congo, which has destroyed their habitat.

#17. Hawksbill Turtle

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This species is found near tropical reefs in the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic oceans. However, they’re dying, mostly, because their shells are being sold in the black market. Although sea turtles have been around for 100 million years, there are only 15,000 Hawksbills in the world capable of laying eggs.

#16. Giant Otter

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South American giant otters have been an endangered species since 1999. Since they are hunted for their fur, there are now less than 5,000 of these creatures left .

#15. Tasmanian Devil

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Sadly, the population of this carnivorous marsupial was decimated from 130,000 to 150,000 in the mid-90’s to between 10,000 and 15,000 in the late 1990s as a result of facial cancer.

#14. Kakapo

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This critically endangered bird, which is also known as “owl parrot” is native to New Zealand. Due to an incredibly slow reproductive cycle (every two or three years) there are less than 150 birds in existence. Still, conservationists have been working to ensure the survival of the kakapo chicks to prevent the species from going extinct.

#13. Bowhead Whale

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Poachers hunt bowhead whales for their oil and meat. This type of whale is mostly found in the Arctic and can live up 200 years, provided no outside forces put it in danger.

#12. Honeycreeper

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Disease and habitat destruction have made the Hawaian honeycreeper population decline. According to research published in 2016 in Science Advances, various honeycreeper subspecies have gone down between 68% and 94% over the last 10 years. The Maui Forest BirdRecovery Project, next to other organizations, is working toward the conservation of the remaining honeycreepers.

#11. Amur Leopard

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There are less than 100 of this Russian Far East native leopard subspecies. This is due to fur poaching, forest degradation, and inbreeding.

#10. Bluefin Tuna

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Despite of being able to love up to 40 years, the population of bluefin tuna has been reduced by over 96%, due to over-fishing. There are three bluefin species: Atlantic, Pacific and Southern. The first one is the most over-fished because they’re the largest.

#9. Sumatran Elephant

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A shrinking habitat and ivory poachers are the reason this endangered subspecies of Asian elephant is dwindling in numbers. Nowadays, the population is around 2,000.

#8. Arroyo Toad

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The Arroyo toad is on the list of the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List as an endangered animal. Unfortunately, there are 3,000 left of the breeding population, which only occupy 75% less area than they used to.

#7. Gharial

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From 1946 to 2006, the gharial crocodile population is believed to have decreased as much as 98% over three generations. Now, since there are estimated to be less than 300 in existence, they are listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List. Hopefully, conservation efforts in their native home of the Indian subcontinent will change those figures.

#6. Addax

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Addax are classified as critically endangered because of unregulated hunting in their native habitat in the Sahara. Sadly, a 2016 report uncovered that there were only three remaining addax in that region.

#5. Malayan Tiger

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Malay Península tigers are classified as critically endangered, since there are less than 300 left in the world. Not only are they being poached for their meat, but also for their bones. In addition to this, over-development is also downsizing their habitat.

#4. Black Rhino

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Despite a population increase in recent years, black rhinos still remain on the critically endangered list. In fact, it’s estimated that there are less than 2,500 left in their native sub-Saharan Africa. Their horns are what make them constant targets for hunters and poachers.

#3. Pangolin

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The eight species of this animal that there are, are all in danger of extinction. The pangolin is considered “the most illegally traded mammal in the world,” mainly because its meat is considered a delicacy in China and Vietnam. Also, its scales are used to make medicine in China.

#2. African Wild Dog

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Hunting and habitat loss have are making these carnivorous pack animals , who can travel over 44 miles per hour, go extinct. Now, there are only around 5,000 wild dogs left in Africa.

#1. Flatwoods Salamander

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There are two species of this type of salamander and, sadly, both of them are at risk. However, the reticulated subspecies is the one that is currently classified as endangered, as environmental changes such as drought and rising sea levels are making their native areas in the southern United States uninhabitable.

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