Wind Mill Blade

Windmill Blades – Make them or Buy Them?

So you’ve decided to build your own windmill. Possibly you took the right steps and purchased one of the top guides that teach the subject. Or maybe you’re more daring and trying to do it without professionally written instruction. In either case one area where many people get stuck is when it comes time to create their windmill blades.

Really when you get to this step you have two separate options:

   1. Build them yourself – Obviously this is the least expensive route
   2. Buy Premade Windmill Blades – Costs more but is a lot less work

From that I wanted to take some time to talk about the advantages/disadvantages of going either way. In reality if you put a value to your time, by the time you finish building the wind turbine blades yourself, the cost is close to equal. On the other hand, if you’re cheap like me, it might be that you’d rather do it yourself and save the money. In either case there are advantages to going either way.

Buying Your Windmill Blades

First let’s cover the advantages of buying your blades. In this case they are really quite obvious.

   1. The blades are professionally made
   2. More varieties of materials you can buy your blades in
   3. Less concern about getting the correct shape to catch the wind.

Of course there are also disadvantages to buying windmill blades instead of making them yourself. First, it becomes more difficult to tailor your blades to the generator you selected/created for your DIY windmill. And then, of course, there is the cost involved.
Machined blades can run you as much as $1,000 or more. To offset that cost, you may want to check eBay. Often you can find premade blades there, in diameters of 4’ to 6’, for around $100.
Making Your Own Windmill Blades

While there are advantages to buying your windmill blades, there are also some big advantages to building them yourself.

   1. The blades are created with your actual windmill design in mind.
   2. You save your money, and your home power system will cost less.
   3. You get to choose the style of turbine blade to fit your area. Especially in low wind speed areas, this is important.
   4. You get the satisfaction of telling everyone – you did it!

If you do choose to build your own windmill blades, I suggest you take the time to learn about the top three wind power conversion guides. With our top pick specifically, they recently added a video that teaches that exact topic.
In any case, be sure to take the time to design your blades to fit your application. Taking the time to do so will ensure your wind mill operates trouble-free for years to come!

Reducing Your Energy Needs before Going Green

With simple instructions available on how to convert to homemade wind power or DIY solar panels for as little as $200, many people are taking the alternative energy more seriously. When choosing to take on a DIY conversion project the first question most people ask is will one windmill or one large solar panel be enough?

There are too many factors involved here to answer that question for you. But one way to start is to ensure your home is efficient in the first place. In this article we will walk you through some steps that will help you reduce your energy consumption before you start converting your home.  

Reducing Your Energy Needs

One often overlooked step in converting a home to green power is reducing your energy needs in the first place. The average home uses inefficient lighting, power hungry appliances, and poor heating/cooling solutions.  An important step to reducing your energy needs is to look at the inefficiencies in your current system.

Consider:

   1. Replacing old incandescent bulbs with fluorescents or led bulbs will cut your power consumption from light in half.
   2. Replacing old, inefficient, appliances may reduce your energy bills by as much as 30% by itself.

You should also look at your current heating/cooling solutions. For example an electric hot water heater could potentially be replaced by a solar water heater. Maybe that inefficient air conditioner can be replaced with a more efficient heat exchanger.

If you need help choosing more efficient appliances, an excellent resource for this is put out by the Canadian government: https://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/EnerGuide/home.cfm.  It’s called Energuide, and it covers everything power consumption of home appliance to energy requirements of large commercial air conditioners.

Spend some time looking through that guide and calculating how much you can reduce your power consumption in different areas of your home.  By simply taking a look at everything in your home that consumes energy, you will find ways to reduce your energy needs before you start.

You don’t necessarily have to go all out and spend $10,000 replacing everything – but things as simple as changing your lighting will reduce your energy needs before you start your conversion project

Reducing Your Energy Needs before Going Green

With simple instructions available on how to convert to homemade wind power or DIY solar panels for as little as $200, many people are taking the alternative energy more seriously. When choosing to take on a DIY conversion project the first question most people ask is will one windmill or one large solar panel be enough?

There are too many factors involved here to answer that question for you. But one way to start is to ensure your home is efficient in the first place. In this article we will walk you through some steps that will help you reduce your energy consumption before you start converting your home.  

Reducing Your Energy Needs

One often overlooked step in converting a home to green power is reducing your energy needs in the first place. The average home uses inefficient lighting, power hungry appliances, and poor heating/cooling solutions.  An important step to reducing your energy needs is to look at the inefficiencies in your current system.

Consider:

   1. Replacing old incandescent bulbs with fluorescents or led bulbs will cut your power consumption from light in half.
   2. Replacing old, inefficient, appliances may reduce your energy bills by as much as 30% by itself.

You should also look at your current heating/cooling solutions. For example an electric hot water heater could potentially be replaced by a solar water heater. Maybe that inefficient air conditioner can be replaced with a more efficient heat exchanger.

If you need help choosing more efficient appliances, an excellent resource for this is put out by the Canadian government: https://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/EnerGuide/home.cfm.  It’s called Energuide, and it covers everything power consumption of home appliance to energy requirements of large commercial air conditioners.

Spend some time looking through that guide and calculating how much you can reduce your power consumption in different areas of your home.  By simply taking a look at everything in your home that consumes energy, you will find ways to reduce your energy needs before you start.

You don’t necessarily have to go all out and spend $10,000 replacing everything – but things as simple as changing your lighting will reduce your energy needs before you start your conversion project

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